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DIGITECH and ICT across the Curriculum

The Arts

Mathematics

Physical Education and Health

The Arts

This month we have connected with Art Education Victoria to discuss how the Digital Technologies Curriculum and use of ICT can be integrated into Media Arts and Visual Arts lessons. 

When teaching Visual Arts and Media Arts there is an expectation that technologies will be integrated into your lessons. This is referring to using technologies to create or enhance artworks. This is different to the Digital Technologies Curriculum. The Digital Technologies Curriculum explicitly teaches how technologies operate. We have provided some suggestions on how these curricula can be taught in unison.  

These activities have been aligned to the 5-6 and 7-8 Curriculum to demonstrate how the lessons can align to Primary and Secondary schools. The activities and suggestions have been selected so they are easily modified across different levels. Further investigation is required to ensure they align with the specific curriculum and area. Activities may need to be modified to ensure more content descriptions and achievement standards are met.

DIRECT ALIGNMENT TO THE DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES CURRICULUM

MEDIA ARTS

STARTING OUT: CREATING STORYBOARDS

Flowcharts and story boards can be used as planning documents to look at how the project will be put together, what is expected to happen and show the flow of the sequence of events. If possible, and the art project can become interactive, this can be a method to teach students about sequence of steps and algorithms (without coding) such as user input. Teach a relationship between mapping out the explicitly scenes or art projects and how that relates to explicit instructions used in algorithms and flowcharts when planning and designing digital solutions (such as apps and software programs or games).

Resources

ACMI: Storyboards
FUSE Education Stop Motion Animation
ACS ICT Educators’ Community of Practice 
ACS Teacher Resource Algorithms Years 5-6 (to access ACS resources you will need to join the community of practice) 
ACS Teacher Resource: Flowcharts Years 5-6 (to access ACS resources you will need to join the community of practice)

GOING FURTHER: REPRESENTATION OF COLOURS

How colour is represented in ‘real life’ and how it is represented in binary code using the RGB. RGB is the acronym to describe how we see digital colours and images. RGB stands for Red Green Blue. RGB is directly aligned to binary code because colours are stored in digital systems as binary code. A digital image is made up of pixels and all digital imagery is made from the three colours. The change in colour will depend on the value of the red green and blue. 

Activities such as experimenting with colour (as paint, light and digital) can relate to Science and how we perceived visual art works.

          

     Video Source: Images Pixels and RGB code.org.                                          


         Shadow play with colour (2020) Steve Marks


Resources

ACS ICT Educators’ Community of Practice 
ACS teacher information on RGB and binary code (to access ACS resources you will need to join the community of practice) 

STARTING OUT: USING ICT TO CREATE A VIRTUAL GALLERY 

Using ICT can be a beneficial way to allow students to express their opinion of an art piece or a reflection of their own artwork without having to be physically present. 

This use of technology can be beneficial when students’ artwork is on display (whole school art show, or exhibiting work around the school). QR codes can store extended information such as images, videos and website links. QR codes can be used as a reflection to store a students’ reflection and interpretation of artworks. With a quick scan of the QR code the information will be displayed on the device that scanned the QR code (mobile devices and smartphones work best).  Video or audio of student’s responses to artwork can also be used as work to assess their reflection and understanding of the work. 

 
The Dreaming Quilt inquiry display at Princes Hill Primary School 2017
 


Scan the QR code to view It’s a no brainer, art matters by Arts Project Australia:

Resources

Getting started with QR Codes

How to use QR codes in Museums and art exhibitions

QRStuff A website to help you attached you an image, PDF, YouTube video or website to a QR Code

FUSE How to use QR Codes in the Classroom 


GOING FURTHER: AUGMENTED REALITY  

Already utilising QR code’s? Take it a little further with augmented reality. Augmented reality (AR) is a blend of real world and digital elements. It overlays and super imposes digital information such as images, sounds and texts) into the world we see. Using technology, museums and artists around the globe are turning towards augmented reality to enhance and transform traditional artworks and art methods.

Resources

What is augmented reality 

How museums are adopting AR

Artists incorporating augmented into their artwork

5 Augment and Virtual Reality Creation Tools for Students

AR Makr (app available for iPad) 

USING TECHNOLOGY WITHOUT DEVICES 

Teaching the Digital Technologies Curriculum and incorporating that learning into your Art classes can be done without the use of technology.  CS Unplugged has a plethora of examples of teaching computer science (CS) across the curriculum. CS Unplugged uses a constructivists pedagogy – that students create and build their own knowledge. The activities are based on challenges presented to the students. To download the entire book, head to CS Unplugged PDF

.


Image taken from CS Unplugged from Unit Plan: Image Representation

Resources 

CS Unplugged

CS Unplugged Drama or Video Activity

CS Unplugged Unit Plan: Image Representation

FINDING THE RIGHT TYPE OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE VISUAL ARTS CLASSROOM

Recommended: find the right tool to use in the classroom  

Finding the right technology tool for your Art classes is a complex process because access to technology differs between schools and sectors and year levels. Instead, we have put together a list of statements and questions that will help you start the process of looking for the right tool for you to use:

  • What problem are you trying to solve and how technology can help you solve that problem? As soon as you can articulate the purpose of the technology, this will help you understand the best tool for the job you want done.  

  • How will the technology assist you to teach and assess the Arts curriculum? This could be through using learning management platforms to help you push out instructions or 

  • How will the technology be used? What do you want to achieve by using the technology?

If you only have access to a small bank of devices and technology – 

  • Make time to trial technologies. Find platforms that offer trials or free versions first. This will allow you to gain insight into how the technology will be used and decide if it offers you the best solution for the problem you are trying to solve.

CONTRIBUTORS

 
ACS ICT Educators Program works with schools and teachers to develop material to support the Digital Technologies Curriculum. Join for free to access resources and connect with teachers. More information about the program can be found via: https://www.acs.org.au/ict-educators.html


 


Art Education Victoria has been a leading voice in visual arts education in Victoria for over sixty years. Art Education Victoria supports and represents art educators. They advocate for and enhance quality visual arts learning and teaching experiences by providing resources, programs and opportunities for partnerships and collaboration. More information about Art Education Victoria can be found via: https://aev.vic.edu.au/

  Media Arts Visual Arts Digital Technologies

 



Level  5-6       

Explore representations, characterisations and viewpoints of people in their community, using stories, structure, settings, and genre conventions in images, sounds and text (VCAMAE029)

Develop skills with media technologies to shape space, time, colour, movement and lighting, within images, sounds or text when telling stories (VCAMAM030)

Plan, produce and present media artworks for specific audiences and purposes using responsible media practice (VCAMAP031)

Explain how the elements of media arts and story principles communicate meaning and viewpoints by comparing media artworks from different social, cultural and historical contexts, including media artworks of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (VCAMAR032)

Select and apply visual conventions, materials, techniques, technologies and processes specific to different art forms when making artworks (VCAVAV030)

Create and display artwork considering how ideas can be expressed to an audience (VCAVAP031)

Define problems in terms of data and functional requirements, drawing on previously solved problems to identify similarities (VCDTCD030)

Design a user interface for a digital system, generating and considering alternative design ideas (VCDTCD031)

Design, modify and follow simple algorithms represented diagrammatically and in English, involving sequences of steps, branching, and iteration (VCDTCD032)

Explain how student-developed solutions and existing information systems meet current and future community and sustainability needs (VCDTCD034)
 Level 7-8

Experiment with the organisation of ideas to structure stories through settings, genre conventions and viewpoints, in images, sounds and text (VCAMAE033)

Develop and refine media production skills using the technical and symbolic elements of images, sounds and text to represent a specific story, purpose and meaning (VCAMAM035)

Plan, structure and design media artworks for a range of purposes that engage audiences using media elements, technologies and production processes (VCAMAM036)

Present media artworks within different community and institutional contexts for different audiences, with consideration of ethical and regulatory issues (VCAMAP037)

Experiment with materials, techniques, technologies and processes in a range of art forms to express ideas, concepts and themes in artworks (VCAVAV035)


Create and display artworks, describing how ideas are expressed to an audience (VCAVAP037)
Investigate how digital systems represent text, image and sound data in binary (VCDTDI036)

Design the user experience of a digital system, generating, evaluating and communicating alternative designs (VCDTCD041)

Design algorithms represented diagrammatically and in English, and trace algorithms to predict output for a given input and to identify errors (VCDTCD042)

Copyright: All Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) material is copyright. The VCAA makes no warranties regarding the correctness or accuracy of this DLTV & ACS resource. The current Victorian Curriculum and related content can be accessed directly at www.vcaa.vic.edu.au


Mathematics

This month we have connected with Mathematics Association of Victoria (MAV) to discuss how the Digital Technologies Curriculum and use of ICT can be integrated to into Mathematics lessons.

The Mathematics Curriculum does have integration of technologies. However when we are referring to that – it is referencing how to utilise technology for learning purposes. Within the curriculum you’ll find wording like ‘use with or without the help of digital technologies’. In that instance the curriculum is referring to using technology.

Integrate technology to allow students to engage in the learning. If your students are only engaged in the entertainment value of the technology, then critically ask – is the technology worth it?

We have aligned these activities to the 5-6 and 7-8 Curriculum to demonstrate how the lessons can align to Primary and Secondary schools. The activities and suggestions have been selected so they are easily modified across different levels. Further investigation is required to ensure they align with the specific curriculum and area. Activities may need to be modified to ensure content descriptions and achievement standards are met.

STARTING OUT: DIRECT ALIGNMENT OF ALGORITHMS AND DATA

Algorithms and Data collection have direct alignment the Mathematics Curriculum and the Digital Technologies Curriculum (see the table below to view the direct alignment between both curricular).

ALGORITHMIC THINKING

Algorithmic thinking provides opportunities for students to follow and create a well-defined set of instructions to perform a task or solve a problem. Promoting algorithmic thinking encourages and increases students’ ability to solve problems using different strategies.

Promote algorithmic thinking through activities and resources such as flow diagrams, spreadsheets, calculators, dynamic geometry software and even pencil and paper. Algorithmic thinking is less about coding or any specific technology than it is about a systematic method for solving problems.


MAV’s Algorithmic Thinking Lesson - Students will simulate a simple random walk by manipulating sets of numbers using a given rule, for example, if a number is even halve it; if a number is odd, subtract 1 then halve it.

RESOURCES

MAV: 10 Lessons for Algorithmic Thinking

FUSE: Design and implement mathematical algorithms (Level 7)

FUSE: Use algorithms and related testing procedures to identify and correct errors (Level 8)



DATA

There is a similarity between teaching data in the Digital Technologies Curriculum and in the Mathematics Curriculum. Both curricula ask students to demonstrate the skills to collect, collate and analyse data. To align to the Digital Technologies Curriculum, technologies (such as spreadsheets) will be required.

Activities that focus on collecting, collating and interpreting data allows for collaboration across multiple curriculum areas. Data can be collected during a Mathematics session and manipulated using technologies in a Digital Technologies focused session.

RESOURCES

MAV: PDF Creating Graphs and Surveys (pg. 4)

MAV: PDF Read and Interpret Graphs/Displays (pg. 4)

Desmos Graphing Calculator Popular Activities


DLTV Webinar: Numeracy connections with Digital Technologies presented by Nathan Alkison (DLTV) and Catherine Newington (ACS) May 2020

GOING FURTHER: ALGORITHMS AND DATA COLLECTION WITH ROBOTICS

Robots can be programmed and used as a tool to use to collect data.

ACS partnered with a school to create a unit of work that focused on collecting data about plant growth. This unit coincided with a Science (biology focused unit) focus. The focus question was – 'where is the most suitable position to grow our plants in the school?' Prior investigations were needed to understand the ideal climate for the plants to successfully grow (amount of sunlight and the type of climate). Cubit robotics were programmed to collect data about the amount of light and temperature.

This unit focused on collecting data (light and temperature) over the course of different times and days from different positions on the school yard. This data was then used to analyse the most suitable spot for plants to grow based on their needs. It demonstrates how robotics and programming can be used to solve a real-life situation. It gives real meaning to collect, sort and analyse the data.

ACS has a bank of Cubit Kits that are available to borrow and use. These kits come with the capability to log data and then covert that data into a spreadsheet. (ACS specialist, Catherine Newington will support your development of the Cubit Robotics. She can even pop into your classes and lend an extra pair of hands). Contact Catherine via catherine.newington@acs.org.au – she’d love to hear from you!


RESOURCES

Cubit Robotics

Join the ACS ICT Educators Community of Practice

Levels 3-4 Data Collection Unit of work (Need to be part of the community to access the material)



UTILISING ICT TO PROMOTE MATHEMATICAL REASONING

Videos (either made by the teacher or student) can be a powerful way to capture learning. Proficiency of mathematics is a skill that our students need to develop. This shows they have knowledge in articulating problem solving and articulate how and when different mathematical strategies can be used to solved different equations.

STUDENT CREATED VIDEOS

Start by getting your students to record their thinking. An interactive board not only helps you assess how they solved an equation but when students record their mathematical thinking you can assess and understanding the type of strategies they are using (or not using) to solve an equation. A quick answer this question and record your answer is a simple way to start this process.  

TEACHER CREATED VIDEOS

Creating videos does not need to be an overwhelming experience. When creating videos the focus is on modelling mathematical reasoning. This can be achieved with a pen and paper. Keep it simple by creating short and focus on the learning intention. When creating your first video don’t pressure yourself to create long videos. Short bursts will help you and upload them as shorter videos too.

Prepare by making a list of key words. This keeps you on track and provide you (flash cards can serve as a double purpose – a prompt in the video then and as part of a classroom display)

‘4 Triangles’ created by Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM)

RESOURCES

Explain Everything

Book Creator

Eddie Woo creates his videos while live teaching

Examples of concise videos from ATM UK

CHOOSING ICT TO SUPPORT MATHEMATICS

There is a plethora of software programs, games and apps that can be used to supplement teaching of Mathematics. Critically evaluate the value of the technology by pondering and answering questions like:

  • How are students supported when they get an answer incorrect?
  • How does the technology support differentiation? 
  • How are the equations presented? Watch out for vertical display only as this limits students to rely on the vertical style to solve equations. They start to focus on the process rather than the mathematical reasoning and understanding.
  • Does the development of skill align to the curriculum?
  • Is it based on drill and skills or does the software allow for the skills to be applied to problems (worded problems or real life scenarios)? 
  • Take notes of the actual screen. Are there students in your class that would get distracted from the unnecessary use of images, sounds and colours? This could detract rather than assist learning.

CONTRIBUTORS

   

ACS ICT Educators Program works with schools and teachers to develop material to support the Digital Technologies Curriculum. Join for free to access resources and connect with teachers. More information about the program can be found via: 

https://www.acs.org.au/ict-educators.html

The Mathematical Association of Victoria (MAV) is an innovative and leading association. Through its programs and services, MAV promotes the importance of mathematics to society. MAV is a highly respected, proactive professional association that fosters the promotion of mathematics education. More information about the association can be found via: https://www.mav.vic.edu.au


 Level

Mathematics

Digital Technologies

 

 

Levels 5-6

Level 5 Algorithms

Follow a mathematical algorithm involving branching and repetition (iteration) (VCMNA194)

Data

Construct displays, including column graphs, dot plots and tables, appropriate for data type, with and without the use of digital technologies (VCMSP206)

Describe and interpret different data sets in context (VCMSP207)

Acquire, store and validate different types of data and use a range of software to interpret and visualise data to create information (VCDTDI028)

Design, modify and follow simple algorithms represented diagrammatically and in English, involving sequences of steps, branching, and iteration (VCDTCD032)

Develop digital solutions as simple visual programs (VCDTCD033)

 

 

 

 

Levels 7-8

Level 7 

Algorithms

Design and implement mathematical algorithms using a simple general purpose programming language (VCMNA254)

Data

Identify and investigate issues involving numerical data collected from primary and secondary sources (VCMSP268)

Construct and compare a range of data displays including stem-and-leaf plots and dot plots (VCMSP269)

Calculate mean, median, mode and range for sets of data. Interpret these statistics in the context of data (VCMSP270)

Describe and interpret data displays using median, mean and range (VCMSP271)

Analyse and visualise data using a range of software to create information, and use structured data to model objects or events (VCDTDI038)

 

Design algorithms represented diagrammatically and in English, and trace algorithms to predict output for a given input and to identify errors (VCDTCD042)

 

Develop and modify programs with user interfaces involving branching, iteration and functions using a general-purpose programming language (VCDTCD043)


Physical Education

 This was the first a monthly series of articles and later webinars about how to embed DigiTech and ICT into your subject area.

This month we have connected with Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation Victorian Branch (ACHPER Victoria) to discuss how technologies and the Digital Technologies Curriculum can be implemented into Physical education lessons. When starting the implementation of digital technology, keep it simple. Focus on one concept and do that well. Then build your skill as you feel comfortable.

It is important to ensure the technology does not take away from the lessons but rather it assists the intentions of the lesson. Don’t fall into the trap of simply implementing the next “shiny thing”. Evaluate the technology and ensure it marries to your pedagogy and the curriculum. Remember to honor the curriculum, both Physical Education and Digital Technologies Curriculum.

We have aligned these activities to the 5-6 and 7-8 Curriculum to demonstrate how the lessons can align to Primary and Secondary schools. The activities and suggestions have been selected so they are easily modified across different levels. Further investigation is required to ensure they align with the specific curriculum and area. Activities may need to be modified to ensure content descriptions and achievement standards are met.

STARTING OUT: Recording and Using Video

Video is a valuable resource as a means to provide feedback. Students can film themselves when they are attempting to master a skill. Students can watch back the video footage or use a video delay app for providing self-feedback about their skill and technique. These videos can also be used as documentation and evidence when assessing students’ abilities and writing reports. Provide time in the beginning for skill development or review before you introduce the video tools to help with self-feedback. Once students understand the expectations of using the technology, it will become part of the lesson. In a secondary school setting, the media teacher may support you in the initial stages. Note: this does not directly align to the digital Technologies Curriculum. Consider this type of activity an introduction to start the process of using technology in P.E. classes.

   

Resources

Devices that will allow students to record videos and take pictures. An iPad stand is helpful if you have one to have an iPad set up at a station.

BaM Video Delay App or Video Delay Instant Replay! App   

Read more about feedback

Read about how technology can be used for feedback purposes

TAKING A FEW MORE STEPS: Data Collection

Data collection aligns to multiple areas of the curriculum, including the Digital Technologies Curriculum. P.E. sessions can be used as the focus to collect data. Collect data on times, events, distances, participation on various activities, or body angles etc. This will depend on data that can be collected from the event you are completing or skill the students are developing. This could also be collected at any sports carnivals or events conducted in the local community. Data collected over time could take performance times or skill development. This data can be used as a resource for feedback opportunities.

A project like this allows collaboration across multiple curriculum areas. Data can be collected within a P.E. session and collated and turning into information elsewhere. For example, a SEPEP unit (student driven sports competition) could lead to data being collected in class, which is analysed by students in Mathematics or Science. This could be achieved through Mathematics lessons or completed if your school has a dedicated Digital Technologies Specialist or classroom teacher to manipulate with the students.

Resources


Data can be collected on hard copy or inputted into a software program like Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets, Microsoft Forms or Google Forms. This will depend on the available resources at the school. If access to devices cannot is not possible, students can gather data on a readymade hard copy worksheet. Depending on the data you want to collect devices may be needed e.g. stop watches or heart rate monitors.


Once the lesson moves to the collation part be sure to ensure software programs are used to satisfy the requirement found in the Digital Technologies Curriculum.


GOING FURTHER: Virtual Reality

Virtual Reality can allow students to be immersed in experiences that they may not be able to physically experience.

It may provide students with the opportunity to test out decision making skills before implementing into real live activities. Life Saving Victoria has created some resources that help to integrate VR and immersive experiences into lessons. VR was used as a way to introduce students to environment and expectations when visiting a swimming pool or open water for the first time. VR doesn’t have to be expensive you only need two or three headsets as a module for students to rotate through during a lesson. Check out local libraries to borrow some or subject areas may already have purchased a small collection for students.

RESOURCES

Water safety indoors – Life Saving Victoria

Life Saving Victoria Podcast ‘Tech Time’

Explore types of (from entry level to the more experienced) VR Equipment

Using VR to teach about human anatomy


    Robotics and Programming

    Robotics can be used to make decisions on how to move safely in an environment (picking up ques and scanning the environment) to move safely. Robotics can be used to recreate beach and open water scenes. Using movable robotics (such as Spheros) to program the robot to swim between the flags, to swim through a rip or even rescue a swimmer. Don’t have access to robotic equipment yet? Start by writing out the algorithms (algorithms are a set of explicit instructions) through diagrams like a mind map or flowchart.

    Technology can be programmed to keep count and track of movements such as step counting.

    Micro:bit  and other sensor devices can be programmed to automatically count steps. The programming part of the activity can be completed in another session (similar to the data example) and the use of the technology can be implemented as a practical use in the P.E. sessions.

    RESOURCES

    CONTRIBUTORS

     

    ACS ICT Educators Program works with schools and teachers to develop material to support the Digital Technologies Curriculum. Join for free to access resources and connect with teachers. More information about the program can be found via: 

    https://www.acs.org.au/ict-educators.html

    ACHPER Victoria is the leading professional association representing Victorian teachers and other professionals working in the fields of health, physical education, and recreation.More information about their association can be found via: 

    https://www.achper.vic.edu.au/

    CURRICULUM LINKS

     

    Health and Physical Education.

    Digital Technologies

     

     

    Levels 5-6

    Manipulate and modify the elements of effort, space, time, objects and people to perform movement sequences (VCHPEM119)

    Apply critical and creative thinking processes in order to generate and assess solutions to movement challenges (VCHPEM121)

    Acquire, store and validate different types of data and use a range of software to interpret and visualise data to create information (VCDTDI028) 

    Design, modify and follow simple algorithms represented diagrammatically and in English, involving sequence of steps, branch and iteration (VCDTCD032)

    Develop digital solutions as simple visual programs (VCDTCD033)

     

     

    Levels 7-8

    Use feedback to improve body control and coordination when performing specialised movement skills (VCHPEM133)

    Participate in physical activities that develop health-related and skill-related fitness components, and create and monitor personal fitness plans (VCHPEM136)

    Modify rules and scoring systems to allow for fair play, safety and inclusive participation (VCHPEM141)

    Analyse and visualise data using a range of software to create information, and use structured data to model objects or events (VCDTDI038)

    Design algorithms represented diagrammatically and in English, and trace algorithms to predict output for a given input and to identify errors (VCDTCD042)

    Develop and modify programs with user interfaces involving branching, iteration and functions using a general-purpose programming language (VCDTCD043)

    Copyright: All Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) material is copyright. The VCAA makes no warranties regarding the correctness or accuracy of this DLTV resource. The current Victorian Curriculum and related content can be accessed directly at www.vcaa.vic.edu.au


    FURTHER RESOURCES

    You may find FUSE useful CLICK HERE and the Digital Technologies Hub  has a terrific range of excellent activities also there are lots of other web based resources for you to search. 


          

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